Dear Bloglines

I’m sorry that I couldn’t do this to your face, but I’m writing to tell you that it’s over. You might not have seen it, but I’ve tried to be loyal, but the temptations were just too much in the face of your problems, which I’ll admit seem quite small and petty to begin with - but they build and they build. I loved using your beta interface, but it’s been in beta for quite sometime, and getting less reliable; the SSL issues that happened during June/July/August and the endless “Server Communication Error”s.
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Acronyms, acronyms, acronyms

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So long KarmaSphere

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Zend_Form, default decorators and fieldsets

Another less-sysadmin-y, more code-y post today. Zend_Form is pretty handy, and takes care of a lot of the hard work in producing and validating forms. Unfortunately the default decorators aren’t quite as sane in my opinion, which becomes obvious if you start using fieldsets, or display groups, as ZF refers to them - You’ll see your fieldsets getting wrapped in an additional definition list which is basically crap if you ask me.
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Zend Framework and the PHP Sqlsrv extension

On the off chance you’re intending to do any development with using SqlSrv and ZF, I’d suggest taking a cursory look at ZF-7431 before hand. Equally if you’re planning on doing any dev with Sqlsrv and plan to migrate to other SQL platforms later, then it could be just as helpful. The fact that SqlSrv will return PHP objects is rather nice, unless you already have existing code that assumes strings are returned, like almost all other database extensions available for PHP.
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RemasterSys is awesome!

In that past I’ve created custom live unix distro CDs for myself and although it worked I found that it was so time consuming and generally such a pain in the bum that it just wasn’t worth it. Yesterday I had the need (that nerd need, not because I had to, but because I wanted to) to create a customised CD for the house1. I’d heard good things about RemasterSys and figured now was the time to try it.
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HP PSC printers and Terminal Servers

I’ve written about specifying drivers for redirected printers in the past, but it’s not something I’ve had to do for a few months. Last week we had to get a 1500 series HP PSC working on a home workers terminal server session, and it turns out that the “proper” driver isn’t correct and doesn’t install. Luckily it seems that a lot of the HP PSC’s use the same internals as the HP Deskjet series.
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Against better judgement

I’ve been playing around with CouchDB for a few nights, inspired by the work of Stuart Langridge and others at Ubuntu, and also J Chris Anderson. To break myself into the CouchDB world I started poking around at the capabilities, and mostly trying to not think of SQL-isms. Understanding map/reduce and getting your brain out of the SQL world is worth it, if for no other reason than to get a different perspective on data storage.
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Linux drivers for HyperV guests

If you’ve never had to run Linux under HyperV you’ll know that it runs, although it could be better. You’ll also be aware that Microsoft supply drivers via connect, in a binary state with official support for only a few distros. So you can imagine how I felt when I saw the announcement on the LKML. Drivers for Linux guests, in the kernel. Ok, so it’s not in the mainline yet, but it is the start of good and great things.
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Karmasphere and Exim4, on Debian

I’ve rambled on about Karmasphere in the past, but I’ve not actually done anything with it since mentioning it. Sadly today was the day when spam started getting through my crazy system. This clearly was a signal from the gods themselves; to take the next step. The dreaded DNSBL. You might be surprised, but I don’t like DNSBLs. In the past they’ve made my life hard at work - especially when we’ve inherited an IP that was previously used by spammers, in some way, shape or form.
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